Multipoint Lock on Steel Door Stripped Down and Serviced in Brimscombe, Stroud

These steel doors with multipoint locks seem to be a lot more common. Although a few years old now, we seem to be seeing more and more of them, that could be because the locks on them now need servicing as they are starting to fail in a few areas – this job was in Brimscombe, Stroud.

They have two side bolts and a top and bottom bolt along with the bolts that come out of the face of the centre lock case.

The bottom bolt holes in the frame itself are often full of dirt / grit etc which stops the bottom bolts from shooting in to those holes, this in turn restricts the amount of movement the rest of the locking bolts can make.

Here is a photo of the bottom bolt holes that we had to clear out on this door frame to start to make the locking system work properly again.

Bottom bolt holes in the steel door frame full of grit

Here are the top bolt holes for comparison – they are clear of any obstruction – as they should be. Also see the image of the top bolts on the top of the door as they are slightly rusted and needed some cleaning and lubrication.

Top bolt holes in the steel door frame
Top bolts on the steel door

Here are the side bolts that shoot out to lock in to the frame, these were stuck with old grease that had gone sticky.

A side bolt on the steel door
A side bolt on the steel door
A side bolt on the steel door
A side bolt on the steel door
A side bolt on the steel door
A side bolt on the steel door
A side bolt on the steel door

The centre lock case was removed and serviced on-site. This version of the lock has three bolts that fire out and a latch above. The key turns two full revolutions fire in the bolts out half of the way first and then to the full extent on the second turn. There is a small knob below the euro cylinder (where the key goes). This small knob shoots a single bolt out of this lock case and it can’t be retracted from outside the door with the use of a key. It can only be retracted but turning the small knob from inside the property again.

Centre lock case on the steel door
Centre lock case on the steel door
Centre lock case on the steel door
Centre lock case on the steel door

With the centre lock case removed from the door you can see the ends of the rod mechanism that fires the side, top and bottom bolts. These attach to the centre lock case and when the key is turned these are moved up and down to make the other bolt work move.

Bottom rod end connecting the side and bottom bolts
Top and bottom rod end connecting both side and top and bottom bolts
Top rod end connecting the side and top bolts